Community Blogs
 

Included below is a feed of the latest blog posts created by the GLOBE Community. To view a tutorial on how you can create a blog click here 



SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Lindsay W. in the field, sampling a mosquito larvae habitat site in her study area. Photo credit: Author. California has recently emerged from a multi-year drought, but I live at the edge of a town in the chaparral where water is typically scarce. I often travel miles by car to find potential mosquito habitats, only to find no larvae in those water sources. I eventually contacted Vector Control in hopes that they could direct me to potential breeding sites, and they sent me a few locations. As of yet, most sites I’ve visited have had water and no...


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       Left: example larva of the genus Toxorhynchites recovered from one of the author's research traps. Right: Larval specimen of prey, Culex quinquefasciatus, for comparison. Toxorhynchites are predator larvae  and easily recognized by their unique morphology and larger size. Photo credit: Author. Toxorhynchites is part of the mosquito family (Culicidae), also known as the “elephant mosquito” and “mosquito eater” and for good reason!  These formidable larvae use their mandibles to prey on the larvae of other mosquitoes inhabiting the...


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SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Parker L. in his lab, identifying a specimen recovered from one of his mosquito research traps. Photo credit: Author. I am fascinated at how effectively Aedes albopictus has expanded beyond its historical geographical origins in Asia, sticking its proboscis into Texas along with every continent across the globe except Antarctica.  This invasive mosquito, which serves as a vector for dengue and chikungunya, has been enormously successful in utilizing alternative breeding containers to supplement its natural oviposition sites.  In fact, it is...


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SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Thien-Nha T. in the field, documenting potential larvae habitat sites. Photo credit: Author. Before this project, I never ever imagined I would be interested in studying any type of bugs, much less mosquitoes -- my itch-causing nemesis. However, the more I realized how interconnected these bugs are with the rest of the world and even my own life, the more I saw their importance. My field experiment was designed to figure out what vegetation and color surrounding would attract the most mosquitoes. The structure and goal of the experiment were...


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SEES Mosquito Mapper intern in the field, setting mosquito traps. Photo credit: Clara U. Something that has fascinated me in the research I have done so far is the vast impact that human activity has on the distribution of mosquito communities. Globalization and human travel are thought to be responsible for introducing many mosquito-borne diseases to unlikely areas, for example, spreading the Culex tarsalis , a vector of western equine encephalitis, to Washington State. Artificial habitats that foster mosquito breeding can develop in abandoned tires, plastic containers, and...


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